The Library of Congress has made a ton of images available of women working during WWII — actual real-life riveting Rosies. You can see a bunch more at Stuff Mom Never Told You.

Careers, Identity, Alienation: Confronting That Terrible Question: "So, What Do You Do?"

Read Drake Baer’s article, "Careers, Identity, Alienation: Confronting That Terrible Question: "So, What Do You Do?" at FastCompany, in which he speculates on what people are really asking when they ask “so, what do you do?” and suggests some alternatives questions that are less fraught with tension and anxiety.

Have you seen this campaign for people to donate their one day’s wage to the cause of ending global poverty?

It’s called One Day’s Wages.

To calculate your daily wage, multiple your annual salary by 0.004.

When brokenness exists at all three levels in the workplace—the industry, the community, and the individual—where can we find hope?

Bethany Jenkins from her essay "How to humanize the workplace," which you can read at the Patheos blog, Living Our Labor.

In this essay, Jenkins goes on to expand on the brokenness of the workplace at these three levels and reimagines a more humanized alternative.

The Cities Where Even 3 Minimum Wage Jobs Won't Pay the Rent

likeleaves:

“Every man gives his life for what he believes. Every woman gives her life for what she believes. Sometimes people believe in little or nothing, and so they give their lives to little or nothing. One life is all we have, and we live it as we believe in living it…and then it’s gone.  But to surrender who you are and to live without belief is more terrible than dying – even more terrible than dying young.”
― Joan of Arc

Such sadness in this line: “they give their lives to little or nothing.”

likeleaves:

“Every man gives his life for what he believes. Every woman gives her life for what she believes. Sometimes people believe in little or nothing, and so they give their lives to little or nothing. One life is all we have, and we live it as we believe in living it…and then it’s gone.
But to surrender who you are and to live without belief is more terrible than dying – even more terrible than dying young.”

― Joan of Arc

Such sadness in this line: “they give their lives to little or nothing.”

The Late Great American Promise of Less Work

Keep reading “The Late Great American Promise of Less Work” by Matt Novak.

I love that Novak has a picture of George Jetson at the beginning of this piece.

fastcompany:

For one month, I became the “micro-entrepreneur” touted by companies like TaskRabbit, Postmates, and Airbnb. Instead of the labor revolution I had been promised, all I found was hard work, low pay, and a system that puts workers at a disadvantage. Read more>


Sobering, sad, piece. Think: The gig economy version of Barbara Ehrenreich’s Nickel and Dimed: On (Not) Getting By in America.  
Keep reading “Pixel & Dimed: On (Not) Getting By in the Gig Economy” by Sarah Kessler.

fastcompany:

For one month, I became the “micro-entrepreneur” touted by companies like TaskRabbit, Postmates, and Airbnb. Instead of the labor revolution I had been promised, all I found was hard work, low pay, and a system that puts workers at a disadvantage. Read more>

Sobering, sad, piece. Think: The gig economy version of Barbara Ehrenreich’s Nickel and Dimed: On (Not) Getting By in America. 

Keep reading “Pixel & Dimed: On (Not) Getting By in the Gig Economy” by Sarah Kessler.

I was thinking about this Richard Scarry book, What Do People Do All Day?, which we had when my sons were little. I was thinking about how it spread the net wide to show all the people that are needed to make a society work. While googling to find an image to use I came across this wonderful blog post from several years ago by Giovanni Tiso at “Bat, Bean, Beam.”

"I return to a favourite topic: books for children and what they tell them (and us) about society, and especially about work. I continue to operate on the basis of an anecdotal hunch, not yet supported by a systematic and quantitative survey of the literature: namely, that we don’t do this any more, that there is no longer a market for this kind of book: the comprehensive telling of how the economy operates, along with attempts to place the individual in it. This is not to say, as usual, that the accounts are uncomplicated, nor that they are ideologically transparent or sympathetic. But rather that it may say something that we’ve stopped even trying – something about the less visible, tangible nature of work, but also about our diminished capacity to understand and represent it." 

Keep reading "What do people do all day?" at "Bat, Beam, Bean."

I was thinking about this Richard Scarry book, What Do People Do All Day?, which we had when my sons were little. I was thinking about how it spread the net wide to show all the people that are needed to make a society work. While googling to find an image to use I came across this wonderful blog post from several years ago by Giovanni Tiso at “Bat, Bean, Beam.”

"I return to a favourite topic: books for children and what they tell them (and us) about society, and especially about work. I continue to operate on the basis of an anecdotal hunch, not yet supported by a systematic and quantitative survey of the literature: namely, that we don’t do this any more, that there is no longer a market for this kind of book: the comprehensive telling of how the economy operates, along with attempts to place the individual in it. This is not to say, as usual, that the accounts are uncomplicated, nor that they are ideologically transparent or sympathetic. But rather that it may say something that we’ve stopped even trying – something about the less visible, tangible nature of work, but also about our diminished capacity to understand and represent it."

Keep reading "What do people do all day?" at "Bat, Beam, Bean."

NEA report: More than a quarter million Americans have a side job as an artist or musician.

Keep reading "Creating Art as a Second Job" by Tom Jacobs.

Find the NEA report here.

"You’ve been working so hard I can feel it."

A good song with which to end the week.

Over the Rhine’s “Favorite Time of Light” from their Meet Me at The Edge of The World album.

Leave the dishes in the sink don’t overthink it
Close up the brokenhearted piano
Join me on the porch if you can swing it
Let’s dream an ocean in Ohio

You’ve been working so hard I can feel it -
The clean and honest sweat upon your skin
I wanna see the rosy light on your face
Is this evening free or did it cost us everything

It’s our favorite time of light

Read the rest of the lyrics here.

The Most Highly Recommended Job In America Pays Less Than $35,000

My optometrist does always seem content and relaxed. Here’s a clue.

workspaces:

building the Golden Gate bridge » 1933-1937 » via rainyowl

workspaces:

building the Golden Gate bridge » 1933-1937 » via rainyowl

Is a hostile work environment making you obese?

A paper released in the current issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine reported findings from a survey conducted by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) in 2010. Data were analyzed to identify work conditions associated with obesity.

Work-related factors that were significantly associated with obesity include: working more than 40 hours/week, working in a hostile work environment, and job insecurity. Interesting, obesity and work-family imbalance were not significantly associated.

Among industries, obesity was most common in public administration. The healthcare and social assistance industries also had a high prevalence of obesity. Specific job titles that were significantly prone to obesity include: protective service workers (the highest prevalence), architects and engineers, community and social service workers, and office and support staff.

The study authors conclude:

"Public health professionals and employers should consider workplace interventions aimed at reducing obesity that take organization-level factors, such as scheduling and prevention of workplace hostility, into account along with individual-level health behaviors such as diet and exercise."

Read the full paper, “Prevalence of Obesity Among U.S. Workers and Associations with Occupational Factors” by Sara E. Luckhaupt, et al, here.

districtofcalamity:

St. Francis de Sales on Vocations